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 DNN Software Has Been Acquired by ESW Capital – Here’s What You Need to Know

DNN Corp. produces the EVOQ platform and the open-source version DotNetNuke – the most popular Microsoft Windows-based Content Management System (CMS) software. Earlier this week, rumors started circulating that DNN Corp. was about to be acquired. There has been talk and speculation about this kind of thing for years, and it has always been something that the DNN development and user community has kept an eye on. The news just dropped that the rumors were true this time. But rumors are rumors, so let’s talk about what we know so far.

 June 2017 DNN/Evoq and Module Security Summary

The past week has been a bit hectic in the DotNetNuke/Evoq space.  Four confirmed security vulnerabilities were identified that could impact existing installations, one last week and three this week.  Sadly, many sites have already been exploited by these vulnerabilities, adding a bit more urgency to the situation.  Although many people are aware of the situation we have found that not everyone knows what is going on, so we thought it would be prudent to share what we know about the situation.  This information is being shared both on Mitchel's Technical Blog as well as our corporate website.

 Performance Testing Success Story: An Active Third-Party Vendor

I often talk about the importance of having well performing applications.  The reasons for my focus on performance are vast and range from the user experience, ability to handle load, Search Engine Optimization (SEO), and everything in between.  One of the most common issues that I will encounter with client sites when optimizing is that the root of their performance problem might reside with a third-party component that they have used.  Sometimes this was a component they selected, other times it was a component another consultant recommended, and even other times it was an item that was part of the framework that they were using and they did not have a choice.

 Understanding the Logistics of Moving Websites

Recently for a number of reasons I have been working with individuals that are taking a website and moving them from one hosting provider to another.  Sometimes these moves are taking the existing site as is, other times it is migrating to a "new site" at the same time.  However, after doing at least 10-12 of these in the past few months a few common points of "confusion" have come to light.  As such, due to popular request I'll lay out the basics of how to move a website from one hosting provider to another and discuss the component parts that are involved in such a move. 

 Knowing Your Website And Component Parts

Over the past few months we have seen a number of situations where we encounter customers that have had horrendous issues with their websites.  As we work to resolve issues for these customers we often find that key information that either allows us to help them, or that would have prevented then from being in the situation that they were placed in.  After seeing a number of common trends we thought it would be important to start sharing some insight on some key items that should be known by all website owners, regardless of their technical ability.

 Managing a Disaster and Protecting Your Assets

Over the past 24 hours we have assisted a large number of customers with server disasters, mostly stemming from a series of Windows Updates that went horribly wrong.  I blogged about the main issue on my personal blog today under the title, Windows Updates, Monitoring, and ASP.NET Oops!.  If you have not yet read this article, I strongly recommend you check it out as well as continuing with this article.  By most accounts that type of an issue would be considered a disaster with sites being down and resources unavailable to perform their regular duties.  Today's excitement prompted a lot of questions regarding the concept of true disaster preparedness and what levels of protection a customer needs to ensure their assets are properly protected. 

 Balancing Need for Help and Security

It is a regular occurrence for us to receive requests from people that are experiencing extreme issues.  It could be a single site that is down, a whole server that is having problems or any combination of other issues.  While we totally understand the urgency behind each of these requests, it is amazing the types of security risks that users will put themselves into, just to get help.  In this post I will outline our "best practices" recommendation for balancing the line between security and the urgency for help.

 Securing User Passwords in DotNetNuke

If you have been paying attention to the news in recent months you have most likely heard of a few cases where user information, such as Usernames and Passwords, have been exposed from some high visibility websites. Some of the more current leaks were with Gawker and Mozilla. For those that are unfamiliar the situation is pretty simple. These sites store user login information, usernames and passwords, that allow users access to their systems. Their systems were then breached and malicious users were able to get access to the information. Why is this something that I am blogging about in relation to DotNetNuke? Well, without a bit of configuration your site could be at risk, should a malicious user get access to your system. 

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